Date: 31st May 2013 at 5:39pm
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Football nutrition has changed since the days of Sir Matt.

Football nutrition has changed since the days of Sir Matt.

You could argue that footballers have always used nutritional supplements, but it would be fair to say that the most commonly used ones back in the 1970s and 80s were lager and a packet of Rothmans.

Modern football is entirely different though, and footballers are expected to take care of their bodies to a far greater extent than they were in the past, leading to much greater use of supplements like whey protein shake, creatine and glutamine that are found at sites like Maxishop.co.uk.

Each of these different supplements has a different role to play in helping a footballer remain in peak physical condition, with creatine considered to be a real aid – alongside an exercise programme – in building muscle mass and strength. This is important in ensuring that players are able to cope with the physical demands of the modern game. Whey protein also assists muscles to grow and repair following periods of physical exercise, making it crucial not only in helping to maximise the benefits of this exercise, but also in helping players to recover following muscle injuries. Glutamine provides energy for the body’s immune system, helping footballers to avoid illness, but also helps to prevent muscle damage caused by muscle catabolism, which can occur due to the depletion of glutamine in the body following exercise.

While some of these nutrients (like creatine) are present in foods like fish and meat, supplements are a much quicker and more practical way to absorb them, following training or before a match, and this has led to them becoming part of the dietary regime at most professional football clubs these days. This has probably impacted on football by contributing to the greater dynamism and speed of the modern game, as well as ensuring that players are able to make faster – and more complete – recoveries from the injuries which are an inevitable part of it.